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Deeper Weekend 2014

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Business

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  • Greg Kyte
    Greg Kyte
  • Jason Blumer
    Jason Blumer
  • Jon Lokhorst
    Jon Lokhorst
  • Melinda Guillemette
    Melinda Guillemette
  • Scott Kregel
    Scott Kregel

Jason BlumerJuly 1, 2014 was the Blumer CPAs 2 year anniversary of being a virtual firm. We messed some stuff up, but have also learned a lot. I believe our virtualness sets us apart, so we are committed to getting better at being a virtual firm. So that I can add to my learning around being virtual, I’m documenting 9 things we’ve learned in 2 years of being virtual.

First, let me define virtual. We do not have offices, and thus we don’t exist anywhere except at a web address. But you could have firm offices and still be virtual to your clients. In that scenario, the team still meets together in one location, but the clients may or may not come to your offices. I don’t call that virtual, I call that paperless. Virtual in my definition is when a client can not assume that they have access to you physically. It’s a totally different mindset, and that’s why I’m defining it. Read more

Category:
Business, Leadership, ROWE, Strategy
Comments:
4
REFM -  Adrian Photo Square - CATOBThose of you tracking the Thriveal blog for a while may have noticed one of the themes I’ve been exploring over time through my posts is: where is the practice of accounting headed? Entries on that topic include:  A Profession In Search of an IdentityThe Firm(s) of the Future(s)Accounting Is Not the Language of Business, and the most recent: Accounting For What. In that post, I came right up to, but didn’t take, the last leap in the hopscotch of the thought process, which is what I’d like to share now: “The customer is the product.”

 

I first heard that phrase uttered by good friend and Verasage founder, Ron Baker, at a conference last fall and it caused me to do a full stop in my tracks. I realized I can be focused on what we’re selling, and changing our offerings, and marketing our products and services, and on and on. But the truth of the matter is, it’s the customer that’s the product. And what I do is best measured by how it changes their lives.
Category:
Business, Customer Experience
Comments:
5

REFM -  Adrian Photo Square - CATOBIt’s coming. But somehow it helps to know it’s coming.

 

There’s always the initial excitement, and the expansive vision of new possibilities. Then reality sets in.

 

The key is to recognize it’s part of the process: One does not reach the “plateau of productivity” without walking through the “trough of disillusionment.” The trough is where the idea is purified, distilled, crystallized — stripped of its misconceptions, to see what truly lays inside. Read more

Category:
Business
Comments:
8

Jennifer BlumerAs a business owner, you have a lot going on. And maybe you are trying to please a lot of people AND keep the lights on. That’s a lot of pressure. These rights are basic and maybe a little obvious, but a reminder never hurt. Maybe the reminder will help you remember to take care of yourself.

You have:

The right to say no – You don’t have to serve people whose numbers on caller ID make you cringe. You have the right to say no to a lunch appointment “just to catch up.” You have the right to say no to offering services you hate. You can say no with class, but sometimes you need to just say no.

The right to be paid for the value you provide – Your customers want access to you. Sometimes they really do have a quick questions. (And sometimes they say they have a quick question that is anything but quick.) I am not suggesting you send a bill for every phone call. I am suggesting you price in a way that makes you less frustrated when you get those kinds of calls. And that you stop working for free. Is your client paying for a tax return? Then why are you also cleaning up their accounting for the whole year? Get paid for the value you are providing. Read more

Jason BlumerThose are the two business extremes in my brain… Mediocrity and Greatness. I actually believe there are few that live in those extremes, though it often seems like many do. Our world is either drawn to the dummies (so we can feel better about ourselves), or to the few that are crazy great (so we can extol them and begin our worship). If you are one of the regular people like me that “have good intentions” then I classify you as Trying Hard. On the scale ofMediocrity to Greatness, I guess Trying Hard is a little closer to Mediocrity than Greatness. What’s dead in the middle? I guess Jim Collins would say Good is dead in the middle between Mediocrity and Greatness (I don’t know, just guessing). But we all know Mr. Collins wants you to move away from Good to Greatness. Read more
Category:
Business
Comments:
3

Greg Kyte 2A couple months ago I was working on a joke about Bitcoin and other virtual currencies. The punchline needed an extremely devalued, exotic currency. So I googled “devalued currency,” and that’s when I found out that dongs are the currency of Vietnam.

Disclaimer: If you Google “Vietnamese Dong,” you will see questionable websites with banners that say things like, “In a Down Market, the Dong Stays Up” and “Dong Talk.” Search results also include various graphic images like the following: Read more

Category:
Business, Other Thoughts
Comments:
11