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Deeper Weekend 2014

Posts Categorized:

Leadership

Choose your favorite writer

  • Greg Kyte
    Greg Kyte
  • Jason Blumer
    Jason Blumer
  • Jon Lokhorst
    Jon Lokhorst
  • Melinda Guillemette
    Melinda Guillemette
  • Scott Kregel
    Scott Kregel

 

When I ask CPAs about their biggest operational challenge, their answers are remarkably similar. Nearly all have to do with how to deliver less-than-stellar news involving employee performance.

One of my friends who leads a small CPA firm expressed regret about hiring a bright young man who just couldn’t seem to get the work done on time. When I asked the managing partner how he handled the issue, he said, “Well, I gave him a very harsh review at the end of the year.” “How’d he take it?”, I asked. “Not well. He seemed upset and confused, and yet still nothing has changed.”

What’s wrong with this picture? Read more

Category:
Leadership, Management and Operations
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0

As I consider the foundational components or requirements to scale a firm, one thing I would list is ‘Owner Health Activities.’ The more my partner and I grow our firm, the more important this becomes. I’m not only talking about working out at the gym, though physical health is a component. There is more to health than the physical aspect. Taking care of your mind can be a huge benefit as you grow your firm. The ability to think fast, think differently, think with others in the way they think, or think more deeply can make you a bullet-proof firm owner. And the emotional balance firm owners need during busy times, stressful times, and during elations is part of managing and maintaining health. Read more

Category:
Leadership, Personal Growth
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0

There’s nothing firm owners enjoy less than an awkward, difficult, honest conversation with a team member. Yet have them you must. There are times when one of your employees isn’t performing well, is behaving poorly, or is simply tap dancing on your last nerve. Usually, the team member provides no help in initiating these conversations, because he seems to be blissfully unaware that anything is amiss. You’re totally on your own. What should you do? Read more

Category:
Leadership, Personal Growth
Comments:
1

I was a middle school math teacher for eight long years. I finally quit teaching because I wanted to find a career where I could actually make a difference in the lives of others. That, plus I couldn’t stand those bastards.

 

As a teacher I worked with some amazing people. One of my fellow teachers taught a speech and drama class. One of the projects she assigned her students was to film a music video. Very cool. One group of students wanted to film their video on the roof of the school. Also very cool. She let them do it. Very cool? And she let them do it unsupervised. WTF? Read more

Category:
Leadership, Management and Operations
Comments:
2
For many entrepreneurial leaders, it feels odd asking for help, or relying on others. After all, entrepreneurs are people with passion and grit to do amazing things. But that passion and grit can get you only so far as your firm starts to scale larger. It often becomes surprising that the passion begins to drain out of the Founder of an entrepreneurial company that is growing larger.

 

At that point, the firm leaders/founders need help to continue to scale a company in a healthy way, and the job of the firm CEO becomes more tightly focused on leadership and vision. I can tell you from experience that to maintain a healthy focus on leadership and vision means the CEO/Founder must remain personally healthy. Things can fall apart quickly if the firm founder is being drained, not sleeping well, not eating well, or failing to exercise. Again, it’s hard for the entrepreneurial leaders themselves to request this help because they are the types of people that don’t typically seek help.

 

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Category:
Deeper Weekend, Leadership
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0

I suck at sports.

In college, my roommate recruited me to be on an intramural softball team. During practice, I got hit in the face by a ground ball. That’s how bad I suck. A softball that was rolling on the ground, broke the laws of nature, jumped up, and hit me in the face … just to make sure that I understood that the Sport of Softball knows that I suck.

Before becoming a CPA I was a middle school math teacher. Every year, on the last day of school, the teachers would play against the eighth-grade basketball team. In the 70-year history of the school, the teachers never lost. Until I played. That was the first and only year I played, and that was the first and only year the teachers lost.¹ Read more