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Deeper Weekend 2014

Posts Categorized:

Leadership

Choose your favorite writer

  • Adrian Simmons
    Adrian Simmons
  • Bryan Coleman
    Bryan Coleman
  • Greg Kyte
    Greg Kyte
  • guestblogger
  • Jason Blumer
    Jason Blumer
  • Jennifer Blumer
    Jennifer Blumer
  • Scott Kregel
    Scott Kregel
Jason BlumerI’ve had some successes and failures as a leader lately. I want to write down what I’m learning.
Here is what I’m learning as a leader:

 

1. I’m leaning into my human work. I ain’t no boss, and I sure ain’t no manager. Bosses like to tell other people what to do, and managers check up on people to make sure they did what they were supposed to do. I hate both of those. Leaders serve. And who are they serving? Humans. And humans are messy. I’m messy. It seems, “Messy + Messy = Miscommunication, Confusion, and Frustration.” But what if “Messy + Messy = Opportunities to Become Better Humans?” I’m learning that it does mean that, at least for me. So I’m leaning into people. I’m leaning into my partner, Julie Shipp. I’m leaning into my team. And I’m leaning into my wife. I’m leaning into my clients. Leaning into human work means you are going to step on toes, and awkwardly do and say things you didn’t mean. But I’m going to do it anyway because I believe leaning into humans will bring great transformation for me, my team, and my clients.

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Category:
Leadership
Comments:
4

Jason BlumerHierarchical models of management in professional accounting firms all over the world are being challenged by new ways to build a business. It seems new business models (based on hearing every voice on the team), or focusing on results (and nothing else) are becoming more and more popular as the younger generations begin running the world. It seems some of these methods are hell bent on eliminating management, whether management is needed or not. Is it?

What is a business model, anyway? For that answer, let’s turn to the guru and author of Business Model Generation, Alex Osterwalder. In this book, Osterwalder defines a business model as “the rationale of how an organization creates, delivers, and captures value.” Basically, an accounting firm’s business model explains why they sell what they do, how they price for it, and how what they sell transforms their clients. According to Osterwalder, you need a cool chart, building blocks, and some markers to get it done. Business model creation is currently a fad, growing more and more popular every day. I guess it’s our search for why working at a lame firm sucks. But do we need a new business model? Read more

Category:
Business, Leadership, ROWE, Strategy
Comments:
4
Jason BlumerOne main job of a firm leader is to be a salesperson. This is at the heart of the main thing we do. And it’s important to build your firm so that you can devote time to this important function. I’ve tried to delegate this role to others in my firm, and it hasn’t worked yet. I find it is one of the most difficult roles to delegate for a few reasons:

 

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Category:
CPA firm, Leadership, Videos
Comments:
7
Scott KregelIf we look back on our lives (the older we are the farther we may look), I would venture to say that at some point in our life we were influenced by an individual in ways that have marked us today. Maybe that individual challenged you, maybe they taught you, or maybe they simply encouraged you in your own personal growth.

 

As leaders in our firms, we have the distinct opportunity of shaping a leadership culture with those in our areas of influence. Leadership, to me, is something that is shaped in the context of relationships. We don’t lead a faceless team; we lead a collection of individuals with unique ideas, insights and perspectives. How we choose to lead often leaves a mark on the individuals in much the same way that we were marked by others before us. Multipliers, by Liz Wiseman, came out of this former Oracle executive’s experience as a key leader in a major software company. She worked for a successful corporation that recruited the best talent and she was intrigued by the intelligence of those around her. Through that experience she was a genius watcher. She experienced a clear dichotomy in how she saw leaders use their “genius.” Her theory led her on a path to see what leadership looked like from these geniuses:

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Category:
Book Review, Leadership
Comments:
2
Jason BlumerI am very interested in changing the profession of public accounting. This task will probably mark the rest of my life’s work, in some form or other. How do we take on the big task of changing the profession of public accounting? 3 simple steps.

First, we have to transform how public accounting does its work. This is a big picture goal, but one that is being accomplished by many Thriveal firms across the planet. Firm owners are now believing that they run a strategic business, that they can have the kind of firm they want, and are starting the hard work of building the kind of company that can transform their customers. Public accounting firm owners are pricing for value, making mistakes, serving a niche, taking daily risks, pivoting their business models, operating as virtual firms, traveling while they serve their clients, working in their pajamas, saying no more often, coaching and consulting with their clients, fighting commoditization, leveraging technology, and enjoying the lives that their firms afford them. Firm owners are now acting like entrepreneurs.

How are public accountants transforming their work? Through communities! Communities are the 21st century’s platform to alignment and transformation with their strategic enterprises. Communities like Thriveal, Rootworks, The Boomer Technology Circles, RAN OneBMRG Advisory Group, and Sleeter (and others) are all making headway into creating communities where like-minded people can affect change in bigger ways. Communities bring mass power, and this mass power can be leveraged for greater (and faster) change.
Category:
Innovation, Leadership, Other Thoughts
Comments:
21

Jason BlumerJuly 1, 2014 was the Blumer CPAs 2 year anniversary of being a virtual firm. We messed some stuff up, but have also learned a lot. I believe our virtualness sets us apart, so we are committed to getting better at being a virtual firm. So that I can add to my learning around being virtual, I’m documenting 9 things we’ve learned in 2 years of being virtual.

First, let me define virtual. We do not have offices, and thus we don’t exist anywhere except at a web address. But you could have firm offices and still be virtual to your clients. In that scenario, the team still meets together in one location, but the clients may or may not come to your offices. I don’t call that virtual, I call that paperless. Virtual in my definition is when a client can not assume that they have access to you physically. It’s a totally different mindset, and that’s why I’m defining it. Read more

Category:
Business, Leadership, ROWE, Strategy
Comments:
4