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On December 10, 2013, Thriveal announced the creation of a laboratory for the accounting profession. But what does that actually mean?

In this video, I give a quick five-minute sketch of what the Lab is designed to be:

And next Wednesday, January 29, we’ll be hosting our first “Bunsen Burner Chat” — an opportunity for anyone who’s interested to chat about the Lab, its goings on, to ask questions, talk with other interested industry members, and get a sneak peek at what we have planned for 2014. The chat is scheduled for 4 pm EST, and you can sign up here.

Let the experimentation begin!

Category:
Laboratory
Comments:
0

Jennifer BlumerMore and more firms are making the move to virtual or will in the coming months. Having made the transition from an a traditional office culture to a virtual one, I hope to be able to share some of our experience so you can think through the possible pitfalls and avoid them in your transition.

First, let me define the word virtual as I mean it for this post. Virtual firms do not have a home office. Everyone on the team works in their own space, usually from their homes. I do not mean you have an office but you have the ability to work elsewhere because you use cloud software. That is really cool, but just not what I mean by virtual in this post.

With that out of the way, let’s look at four areas where you could run into a problem. Read more

Category:
Management and Operations
Comments:
2

It’s been over a month since the Thriveal Family Meeting. During this online webinar, Jason Blumer introduced the four divisions of Thriveal and their leaders. One of those divisions is the brand new Thriveal Lab. You’ll be hearing more about the lab soon from its Director, Adrian Simmons. For now though, let’s look at the six beliefs that are foundational to the lab. Notice that each belief is stated in a negative and a positive manner.

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If these beliefs resonate with you, or if you are just curious about us and want to follow along, please join our email list for lab updates here.

Category:
Laboratory
Comments:
0

Greg Kyte 2We’re supposed to be authentic, right?

I thought I was being authentic at the New Year’s Eve party, but the next day, my wife told me that I was being a prick. Not in those words. She said something like “you were really on one last night” which I think means “you were being a prick.”

When I say that I was being my authentic self, I don’t mean that I was being my alcoholic self. I had one glass of champagne at midnight, but that was it. Read more

Category:
Personal Growth
Comments:
4

REFM -  Adrian Photo Square - CATOBThe four dimensions of time are: past, present, future, and nothing. Everything comes from nothing.

The past is already set: it’s not going to change (though how we understand it certainly can change). The present is really the result of the past: what was set in motion then becomes today’s now. And the future will be the result of what we do today. At first glance, it seems like a closed system: at one level at least, everything’s predetermined. The action-reaction chain has already begun, and it’s simply playing out. Read more

Category:
Innovation, Other Thoughts, Personal Growth
Comments:
8
Scott KregelSeveral years ago, two highly respected friends of mine shared book reviews with me. My initial reaction was confusion in finding grown professionals essentially writing book reports… and they didn’t even have to turn them in for a grade. It clicked for me after reading the book reviews that this was a brilliant and key strategy in learning and helped to retain insights from other great minds. I have been using this strategy now for over two years. Not every book gets a review, but for the ones that strike me in imaginative ways I have found this to be a valuable tool. I encourage you to consider strategies to turn those dog earned, highlighted book insights into a ready reference.

 

For those of us that appreciated The Accidental Creative by Todd Henry, we were interested to read his new book in 2013 titled Die Empty. Amazon has labeled Die Empty (Henry) as one of the best books of 2013 (o.k., well it follows “Diary of a Wimpy Kid – book 8” and “The Autobiography of Mark Twain: Volume 2”). In all fairness, Henry delivered an excellent follow up resource. This book is about choosing and implementing the disciplines necessary in your life to keep you on a steady course so you won’t go to your grave with your best work inside of you… you will have died empty. Read more
Category:
Book Review
Comments:
4