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Deeper Weekend 2014

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Marketing and Branding

Choose your favorite writer

  • Greg Kyte
    Greg Kyte
  • Jason Blumer
    Jason Blumer
  • Melinda Guillemette
    Melinda Guillemette
  • Scott Kregel
    Scott Kregel

I was working with a firm owner recently, and we were exploring where his clients were really coming from. He has been growing, but he didn’t really have a website and he wasn’t really marketing. How can you grow if you don’t have a website, a logo, or participate in marketing activities? Similar question: why do some firms fail to grow when they do have a solid website, a logo, and participate in marketing?

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I’m excited to be speaking at this year’s QB Connect conference in San Jose, CA. It’s November 15 – 17, 2017, and you’ll want to register soon (seats are filling up fast)! Come hang out with me!

 

I wanted to give a brief overview of what I’ll be sharing at QB Connect. My partner and I have tried a lot of marketing ideas, and we’ve learned a lot of things that do and do not work. I’ll tell you more at QB Connect, but there are some things I can share with you briefly here in this article.

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conferences, Marketing and Branding
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Blogging and exercising: the two things you never feel like you done enough of. Maybe there are some days when you feel like you nailed it, but even after you’ve finished a half marathon or a killer post, the future is staring at you with it’s cold, dead, passive-aggressive eyes, and you know you’re supposed to repeat that level of performance every day forever.

 

It’s like if Sisyphus were the owner of a CPA firm with a well-defined niche and was purposefully and intentionally positioning himself in the minds of his ideal customers.

 

It’s weird, but I feel like I need to explain the benefits of content marketing; however, I’m also confident you already know all this stuff. So I’ll make it as quick and painless as possible. Read more

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Marketing and Branding
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Greg Kyte 2I have some regrets in life. One regret is that I never bought a Herman Cain for president t-shirt.
Not that I ever supported Herman Cain. I just thought it would be funny to wear a shirt supporting a goofy dude who said some weird stuff, who was leading the polls and whose campaign suddenly and comically self destructed.


So this campaign season I was determined to not make the same mistake. Because like they say: Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on Trump. Read more

Greg Kyte 2Dress codes are simultaneously infuriating and amusing, like presidential candidates.

 

They were the topic for Jason, Caleb, and me on our last #WhatsNext in the Accounting Profession Blab. I thought it would be a fun, light topic, easy to make fun of, but not too deep. Turns out, dress codes are a quick path to the seventh circle of HR.

 

This week, I asked some friends who work at two different mid-size CPA firms to send me their company’s dress codes. And it turns out they are awesome.

 

For one company, under “Examples of Not Acceptable Attire” they listed “stirrup pants,” “bolo ties,” and “bathing suits.” Bathing Suits?! How the hell do bathing suits get explicitly banned on the dress code?

 

Audit Manager: “Hey, Rebecca, are you ready to head to the client’s office for … what the f**k?! Are you wearing a swimsuit?” Read more

REFM -  Adrian Photo Square - CATOBOver the years, I’ve developed a skepticism of brands, a healthy one I hope. And I would venture to say you have too. One ad after another, all making claims to be the best thing ever. Common sense tells us it can’t actually be — we all want to believe that particular cologne/perfume is going to make us instantly magnetic, but we know better. And then there’s one purchase after another; many don’t live up to the hype, some do, some do to begin with, but don’t last. Each of these experiences eats away at our ability to believe, to trust.

Brands can be so impersonal — marketing messages connect us to the brand, and humans become merely the means to get to the brand. Ads create a desire for Cheerios, and supermarkets and checkout registers are just a delivery mechanism to acquire Cheerios for ourselves. The quicker and easier, the better. Products, not humans, are the end. (Or perhaps more accurately, the emotional state promised by the products.)

But brands are real, right? I mean, after all, there’s Coca-Cola, Apple, Southwest, and Rolls Royce. They must truly exist. Or do they? Maybe they’re just made up. Maybe they only exist simply because we all agree they exist. Sorta like language — we all agree this scrawled shape on a piece of paper constitutes a letter, “d” we’ll call it. And we agree that it makes a particular, recognizable sound formed by our mouths and tongues. And when combined with the two other scrawled shapes “o” and “g,” signifies those panting, four-legged furry creatures in our homes. Read more

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Marketing and Branding
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