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Deeper Weekend 2014

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Management and Operations

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    Adrian Simmons
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    Bryan Coleman
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    Greg Kyte
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    Ian Crook
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    Jason Blumer
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    Jennifer Blumer
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    Scott Kregel

Greg Kyte 2Blow crap up.” – Jason Blumer

I’ve known Jason for six years now. I’ve heard all of his stories, the ones about how he’s tried all the stuff that you know you should try at your firm. He’s got a drive to blow crap up, and so he blows crap up, and he learns tons and tons of crap because of the crap he blows up.

Thriveal is accounting for the brave, and brave accountants risk the possibility of blowing crap up. Intentionally taking risks whereby crap may be blown up is something that can be managed; planned risks can be controlled and contained more or less.

But sometimes crap blows up all by itself. And when turds hit fans, you can learn A LOT and you can learn it FAST. Like Tom Hood says, the rate of learning at your firm has to be greater than the rate of change in the profession and greater than the rate of learning among your competitors. Read more

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CPA firm, Management and Operations
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Jason BlumerNo one is really talking about how hard it is to change your compensation structure in a Nontraditional firm. At least, I haven’t seen the articles anywhere. By way of definition, Nontraditional here means that you do not bill your time to the client, or you price all work up front, or you may offer services as a product, allowing your client to pay for their services on a monthly recurring draft or invoice.

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Greg Kyte 2Dress codes are simultaneously infuriating and amusing, like presidential candidates.

 

They were the topic for Jason, Caleb, and me on our last #WhatsNext in the Accounting Profession Blab. I thought it would be a fun, light topic, easy to make fun of, but not too deep. Turns out, dress codes are a quick path to the seventh circle of HR.

 

This week, I asked some friends who work at two different mid-size CPA firms to send me their company’s dress codes. And it turns out they are awesome.

 

For one company, under “Examples of Not Acceptable Attire” they listed “stirrup pants,” “bolo ties,” and “bathing suits.” Bathing Suits?! How the hell do bathing suits get explicitly banned on the dress code?

 

Audit Manager: “Hey, Rebecca, are you ready to head to the client’s office for … what the f**k?! Are you wearing a swimsuit?” Read more

bryanWe can often picture where we’d like to go with our businesses, whether that’s a revenue goal, a certain lifestyle, or a level of power and prestige. The problem is: we don’t always know exactly how to get there. So, sometimes you just have to keep sailing.

If you’re not familiar with how a sailboat works, it’s pretty straightforward. Rather than using a motor, the boat is propelled by the wind pushing on your sail. Makes sense, right? But you can see where you might run into problems if you’re trying to get to a specific destination. Read more

REFM -  Adrian Photo Square - CATOBSystems are so important as enabling mechanisms. Sometimes I like to call them “structures of freedom.” I’m reminded of a quote from Tim Williams at Thriveal’s Deeper Weekend last fall, “Process is the architecture for getting things done.” Even creative processes, like transforming your firm, require some level of scaffolding to help you see it through from concept to realization.

 

Systems can compete with each other too. The system you know and use now will almost always beat out the one that’s fledgling or undefined. This is why it’s almost always easier to spend hours replying to e-mails than to change your firm. There’s a system for e-mail, but not for transformation.

 

So our goal is to develop a creative system for our firm, shield it during its fledgling stage, and then let it grow to become part of our way of doing things, that stands its ground and evidences its value as part of our firm’s operations.

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