Clicky

Deeper Weekend 2014

Posts Categorized:

CPA firm

Choose your favorite writer

  • Adrian Simmons
    Adrian Simmons
  • Bryan Coleman
    Bryan Coleman
  • Greg Kyte
    Greg Kyte
  • guestblogger
  • Ian Crook
    Ian Crook
  • Jason Blumer
    Jason Blumer
  • Jennifer Blumer
    Jennifer Blumer
  • Scott Kregel
    Scott Kregel
Leadership has been something I’ve been growing in for a couple of years now. I even spoke about it at our Deeper Weekend conference last year. During my talk, my perspective was that you are a leader if you are a firm owner. Period. You may be a poor leader or a great leader, but you are still the leader of your firm. It is a fact with the position you hold as the owner of the firm.

Read more

Category:
CPA firm, Leadership
Comments:
2
The Thriveal community is now in its 7th year. We started in October of 2010 as a way to be with other entrepreneurial firm owners. We’ve tried many community ideas along the way and have met many wonderful people. But this year seems different. We have learned so much about what a community means, and how to bring value to firm owners through a community. We truly believe that people building firms in a community grow more than when they try to grow on their own. We have many stories to back this up. Why? This growth happens because a community challenges firm owners in ways they didn’t know they needed to be challenged. And as members of the Thriveal community, we see other members doing innovative things. So we tend to try new things too. But the coolest part of growing in a community is the trust and camaraderie entrepreneurs feel within their community. A community watches out for its members, and supports each other when times get tough. This brings on the bravery needed to be successful growing a firm in a community.

 

Thriveal’s Purpose:

 

Thriveal inspires countercultural firm owners to embrace their entrepreneurial creativity within the profession.
Category:
Community, CPA firm, Software
Comments:
0

Greg Kyte 2Blow crap up.” – Jason Blumer

I’ve known Jason for six years now. I’ve heard all of his stories, the ones about how he’s tried all the stuff that you know you should try at your firm. He’s got a drive to blow crap up, and so he blows crap up, and he learns tons and tons of crap because of the crap he blows up.

Thriveal is accounting for the brave, and brave accountants risk the possibility of blowing crap up. Intentionally taking risks whereby crap may be blown up is something that can be managed; planned risks can be controlled and contained more or less.

But sometimes crap blows up all by itself. And when turds hit fans, you can learn A LOT and you can learn it FAST. Like Tom Hood says, the rate of learning at your firm has to be greater than the rate of change in the profession and greater than the rate of learning among your competitors. Read more

Category:
CPA firm, Management and Operations
Comments:
0

Greg Kyte 2Um … spoiler alert. Did you read the title of this post? If you still need a spoiler alert, then you’re worse at reading social cues than Ben Affleck’s character in The Accountant. And if you haven’t seen Ben Affleck’s movie The Accountant, then what the hell is wrong with you? Even Jason Blumer’s seen The Accountant. The last movie he saw in the theater was Honey, I Shrunk the Kids

The Accountant is rated R, so I guess if you haven’t seen it and you’re a CPA and under the age of 18, I get it. Otherwise, if you haven’t seen it, I’m pretty sure you’re breaking the Code of Professional Conduct.

And I thoroughly enjoyed it. Great movie. Saw it twice. It was tons fun to watch it in a theater full of (presumably) civilians who still got all the accounting jokes.

It’s also cool to think back on the movie and see how many things Ben Affleck’s character, Christian Wolff, was doing right that a lot of accountants and firm owners do wrong. Read more

Category:
CPA firm, Other Thoughts, Pricing
Comments:
1
JasonRocksYou’ve heard this before right? You eat an elephant one bite at a time. Lame, but it does illustrate something I’ve noticed while speaking on the Intuit Roadshow recently (register for free here in a city near you). Here is what I’ve noticed: traditional firms attending this event seem overwhelmed at making the significant changes being required of them. They’ve noticed that technology has changed around them and they are feeling the pressure to change quickly.

 

Topics like the cloud, value pricing, and practice efficiency seems to make them nervous when they are just struggling to find new clients and lead their employees. They have “boots on the ground” problems, and they find it hard to act strategically to change their firms. Some feel the urgency to do it quickly, while others just write it off as something they can’t focus on right now.

Read more

Category:
CPA firm, Personal Growth, Strategy
Comments:
0
Jason BlumerNo one is really talking about how hard it is to change your compensation structure in a Nontraditional firm. At least, I haven’t seen the articles anywhere. By way of definition, Nontraditional here means that you do not bill your time to the client, or you price all work up front, or you may offer services as a product, allowing your client to pay for their services on a monthly recurring draft or invoice.

Read more