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Deeper Weekend 2014

Posts Categorized:

Business

Choose your favorite writer

  • Adrian Simmons
    Adrian Simmons
  • Bryan Coleman
    Bryan Coleman
  • Greg Kyte
    Greg Kyte
  • guestblogger
  • Ian Crook
    Ian Crook
  • Jason Blumer
    Jason Blumer
  • Jennifer Blumer
    Jennifer Blumer
  • Scott Kregel
    Scott Kregel
JasonRocksI’m learning the exponential power of relationship building. And I’m excited as to how fast it can grow your company. We do a good bit of content marketing in our firm, but faster growth is coming from one on one relationships with real people. Relationship building, or Networking as it is often known, and Content Marketing are two important balances in any firm. Most firm leaders are imbalanced on one side or the other. As people, we are drawn to the activity where we feel most comfortable. Surprisingly, I’ve felt most comfortable on the content development side. But relationship building is so important, and I’m unlocking it’s power (and I’m pretty good at that too)!

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Category:
Business, Community, Networking
Comments:
0

Greg Kyte 2Two years ago, I had Liberty Tax do my taxes. Bad Experience. Bad Pricing. They lost my children. Great dance opportunity.
This year I did it again, but this time I went to H&R Block to see how The Block would do. Over the span of my next three blog posts, I’ll to go in detail about H&R Block’s pricing, their customer experience, and their accuracy.¹

 

Greg HR Block

 

This post is the one about pricing. But first, I need to tell you how I got here. Read more

Jason BlumerNo one is really talking about how hard it is to change your compensation structure in a Nontraditional firm. At least, I haven’t seen the articles anywhere. By way of definition, Nontraditional here means that you do not bill your time to the client, or you price all work up front, or you may offer services as a product, allowing your client to pay for their services on a monthly recurring draft or invoice.

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Greg Kyte 2It’s time to get over The Cloud.

 

Don’t get me wrong. The Cloud is great, but so are urinals, and at this point I’d rather read “Five Ways Urinals Will Transform the Accounting Profession”¹ than read one more GD blog post about how CPAs need to embrace The Cloud.

 

The realization that The Cloud has become passe hit me late last month. Jason Blumer, Caleb Newquist and I were getting ready to launch our new monthly videocast on Blab called #WhatsNext in Accounting. Jason suggested the topic for the first episode: “Can The Cloud Save the Accounting Profession?” And I said, “Great topic!” because I’m a team player, but inside I said, “Holy F. I’m probably going to spend the entire episode taking a dump on anybody who thinks this is still an interesting thing to talk about.” Read more

Category:
Business
Comments:
4

Jason BlumerHierarchical models of management in professional accounting firms all over the world are being challenged by new ways to build a business. It seems new business models (based on hearing every voice on the team), or focusing on results (and nothing else) are becoming more and more popular as the younger generations begin running the world. It seems some of these methods are hell bent on eliminating management, whether management is needed or not. Is it?

What is a business model, anyway? For that answer, let’s turn to the guru and author of Business Model Generation, Alex Osterwalder. In this book, Osterwalder defines a business model as “the rationale of how an organization creates, delivers, and captures value.” Basically, an accounting firm’s business model explains why they sell what they do, how they price for it, and how what they sell transforms their clients. According to Osterwalder, you need a cool chart, building blocks, and some markers to get it done. Business model creation is currently a fad, growing more and more popular every day. I guess it’s our search for why working at a lame firm sucks. But do we need a new business model? Read more

Category:
Business, Leadership, ROWE, Strategy
Comments:
4
Jason BlumerI’m reading Peter Thiel‘s new book, Zero to One. Wow. He is truly a contrarian as most of his ideas fly in the face of doing business in any type of traditional way. Some would even say his ideas are scary. One overarching idea I’m noticing in the book is about his focus on building the future. He is dead set on investing in things now that have far reaching future-focused results. I’m glad he has made this his focus. This sums up the struggle in our profession – we do things for immediate results instead of investing in the future. Truly, creating a future-focused firm is hard for a number of reasons:

 

-You have to commit to a future that you think you can create. The future is not here yet. Peter Thiel believes the future will be here when we create it. Many people avoid thinking about the future, as it brings uncertainty and fear. What if we don’t like the future that we create?

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Category:
Book Review, Business, Innovation
Comments:
0