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Deeper Weekend 2014

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Book Review

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  • Adrian Simmons
    Adrian Simmons
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    Bryan Coleman
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    Greg Kyte
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  • Jason Blumer
    Jason Blumer
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    Jennifer Blumer
  • Scott Kregel
    Scott Kregel

Scott KregelOne of the greatest characteristics to exhibit is one of teachability. We admire those who operate with a pursuit of lifelong learning. In fact, how noble it is to call ourselves a lifelong learner. Or how impressive is it to call ourselves a coach who brings transformation to others. If you peel back what is at the core of learning and growth, the ability to give and receive feedback is right there staring at us. Read more

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Scott KregelI have been a fan of Todd Henry since reading The Accidental Creative several years ago. His first book so uniquely expressed for me the idea that even an accountant can be a creative. In Thriveal, we talk regularly about approaching our businesses from the perspective of a creative, but I always wondered if we could really be taken seriously as a creative – just because we called ourselves creatives. We needed to develop practices and environments to fuel creativity in ourselves and in our firms. The Accidental Creative set the stage for building practices into our daily lives to help generate brilliant ideas “on demand.” Practices such as intentional journaling, identifying a Big Three, and curating new stimuli to generate new ideas. These are the ideas that creative professionals and knowledge workers are rewarded for. If you haven’t read The Accidental Creative, I highly recommend this as a must read for anyone who uses their mind to deliver value to others. With Todd’s third book, Louder than Words, we have a manuscript for developing our unique voice.

“Voice” is the expression (idea) you make through a medium (platform) in order to achieve a desired outcome (impact). Your authentic voice is the expression of your compelling “Why.” Read more

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Scott KregelEach time another book review blog post comes around, I look back at the books I’ve read over the past couple of months and I reflect on which book impacted me the most. There have been several books that have met this criterion, but I honestly feel like this audience has already embraced the major concepts in the books. Books such as So Good They Can’t Ignore You (Cal Newport) and Influence, The Psychology of Persuasion (Robert Cialdini) were great, but again they deal with concepts like developing a rare and valuable skill (hone your craft) and understanding decision making biases and what influences them. These are ideas that our readers are well versed in.

However, this past quarter I also took part in my fourth annual reading of Healing Leadership (Geske & Hansen) . This book has shaped me more in the past several years than any other. I briefly shared a concept from Healing Leadership during our 6 minute TED Talks at #DW13 (Deeper Weekend 2013). Let me try to introduce these insightful thinkers to you. Read more

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Book Review
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Scott KregelMany of us have heard of Mastering the Rockefeller Habits. You know – the standing meetings, the quarterly priorities, the common language of reporting, communication and feedback loops. I’ll be honest… I never read the book.

Well, last fall, a customer reached out about some ideas of theirs as it related to a major project undertaking. They talked about a weekly check-in, they talked about budget line item responsibility, they wanted communication rhythm and short-term goals established. I knew right then that our team could add great value to this customer by being a catalyst to model and carry out the very practices taught by Verne Harnish and the team at Gazelles. To my benefit, Scaling Up was just published as the first major follow up to Mastering the Rockfeller Habits. This book looks to build on the ideas in the previous book and includes real life examples and insights gained along the way. Scaling Up takes you through the following: Read more

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Book Review
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Scott KregelSo, if any of you are like me, inspiration is a source of fuel and motivation. Leading a small firm is hard. Meeting the increasing needs of growing customers is challenging. Intentionally developing individual skills takes focus and precious time. And inspiring a group of smart people to work together toward a common goal is a lofty pursuit.

 

As we look to close another year and lean into the start of 2015, I found myself looking for an inspirational book to help shape my mind for the New Year ahead. I found Make Your Mark: The Creative’s Guide to Building a Business with Impact, published by 99U.com. Many of us have felt that tug in our hearts and minds that our businesses are more than a paycheck and a job. In fact, that kind of thinking alone is not even found in today’s creative businesses. We are driven by our commitment to our craftsmanship, beautiful service experiences, giving back and paying it forward. However, a commitment to all of those things can be lost without the attention to creating a sustainable business. A sustainable business is one that pays attention to execution, distribution, packaging, marketing, messaging, strategy, and leadership. A sustainable business is one that acts out its inspiration. Read more

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Book Review
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Jason BlumerI’m reading Peter Thiel‘s new book, Zero to One. Wow. He is truly a contrarian as most of his ideas fly in the face of doing business in any type of traditional way. Some would even say his ideas are scary. One overarching idea I’m noticing in the book is about his focus on building the future. He is dead set on investing in things now that have far reaching future-focused results. I’m glad he has made this his focus. This sums up the struggle in our profession – we do things for immediate results instead of investing in the future. Truly, creating a future-focused firm is hard for a number of reasons:

 

-You have to commit to a future that you think you can create. The future is not here yet. Peter Thiel believes the future will be here when we create it. Many people avoid thinking about the future, as it brings uncertainty and fear. What if we don’t like the future that we create?

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Book Review, Business, Innovation
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