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Deeper Weekend 2014

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Book Review

Choose your favorite writer

  • Greg Kyte
    Greg Kyte
  • Jason Blumer
    Jason Blumer
  • Jon Lokhorst
    Jon Lokhorst
  • Melinda Guillemette
    Melinda Guillemette
  • Scott Kregel
    Scott Kregel

For the past several years, I’ve become more and more fascinated by what it means to be a creative professional. Much of my perspective on this has been shaped by The Accidental Creative, by Todd Henry. The thesis of the accidental creative was centered around building practices into our lives to ensure that we are bringing our best ideas, energy, and enjoyment to others. As it is with many things, the more you dive into topics and ideas you begin to see a whole new world emerge. The art and science of creativity is one those areas of study that is much more and has captured my own imagination. And the story of creativity in our lives is important because of two primary reasons: Read more

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Book Review
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As we finished Life Principles in Part 1 of the book review on Principles by Ray Dalio, we noted the power of relationships in our lives and how they influence us and how we in turn can influence others. It is also true that your ability to get what you want out of life is much greater when working with others than it is when working at it alone. Many of the Life Principles can be applied to groups by taking individual decision making and converting it to group decision making.

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Book Review
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“That individual is a principled leader.”

This is the kind of comment about someone who is conducting themselves based on intention and integrity. It sounds like something worthy to be known by – something that I know I would be honored for people to say about me. The book Principles by Ray Dalio is a collection of the guiding principles that have influenced his life in relationships, in business, and in his leadership of Bridgewater Associates. As I read this book, I was challenged in my thinking about how I was leading with intention and integrity. Amid firm building, it can feel like an amusement park ride that doesn’t end. It’s a thrill, but the intensity and never ending surprises and obstacles keep coming. We have a choice to choose our path or let a path pull us along – now, neither is good or bad, but with principles in our lives I believe our path moves with purpose. Read more

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Book Review, Personal Growth
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Asking questions is a fundamental part of our lives from our toddler years. Early on our questions may have been motivated around stalling our bedtimes or trying to distract our teachers. As we matured, our questions became more involved. We learned that there are open ended, leading, hypothetical, probing questions that help us in getting to the answers we are looking for. However, we also learned that asking questions is often met with mixed responses from others. This book review is about, A More Beautiful Question. In this book, Warren Berger lays out the arguments and a framework for asking questions to bring about breakthrough ideas and meaningful change to our lives. There is so much great content in this book. It will challenge your thinking and bring to mind so many applications in your life as a leader and change maker.

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Book Review
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While listening to a podcast a while back, I was struck by the mention of an issue that is demoralizing workplaces and limiting big results in companies. The issue is ego in the workplace. As I began looking into the research and the thinking behind this, I found Cy Wakeman’s book, No Ego.

 

The driver behind the research and theory of this book is workplace drama and entitlement – or “emotional waste” as the author calls it. This could be further defined as “mentally wasteful thought processes or unproductive behaviors.” The research shows that the average worker is spending approximately 2.5 hours per day in workplace drama. According to the research, ego influences activities such as: Read more

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Book Review
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