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Deeper Weekend 2014

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Choose your favorite writer

  • Greg Kyte
    Greg Kyte
  • Jason Blumer
    Jason Blumer
  • Jon Lokhorst
    Jon Lokhorst
  • Melinda Guillemette
    Melinda Guillemette
  • Scott Kregel
    Scott Kregel
Jason BlumerI was excited to share Thriveal’s vision for 2016 in our annual Family Meeting a couple of weeks ago.
You can watch the recording of our Family Meeting below if you missed it:
Screen Shot 2015-12-28 at 1.26.38 PM

 

We have a leadership team in Thriveal now. This means we are able to make our visions much larger, because smarter people are attempting to pull them off. Have you ever wondered what we do at Thriveal? Here it is…

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Greg Kyte 2Last month I got anchor priced, and I got anchor priced HARD.

 

I was in Greenville for Deeper Weekend 2015, and I was looking for a gift for my wife and my realtor (same person). I wanted to get her something cool, so I popped into the Mary Praytor Gallery, a cool little boutique art gallery on main street.

 

One interesting aspect of the pricing at the Mary Praytor Gallery was that absolutely no one was there. No customers, no employees, nobody. I even went into the back and hollered¹, “Any y’all here?” But none of them all were there, effectively making their prices for everything $0.00. Read more

Category:
Pricing
Comments:
1

Greg Kyte 2My hair sucks. It sucks bad.

 

Since my hairline isn’t receding and I don’t have a bald spot, I don’t have male pattern baldness. Instead I’ve got female pattern baldness (FPB), which means really thin hair on top. The sides are bushy as hell, but the top is thinner than an Olsen twin.

 

I first noticed my FPB in a photo back when I kept my hair buzzed. I loved the buzz cut. No bed head. No hat head. Whenever I did get bed and/or hat head, that was the universe telling me to cut my damn hippy hair. Read more

Category:
Customer Experience, Pricing
Comments:
0
REFM - Adrian Photo Square - CATOBI wonder if you’ll allow me a few moments for some experimental thinking — to explore with you an idea: what is the price of profit? (it may not be in the way you’re thinking.)

 

In a previous post, I ruminated on a different way to view what CPA firms do: we sell access to emotional, intellectual, and creative capacity. What this means to me is that we have care, smarts, and the ability to imagine, and that’s truly what our customers want from us. This is how we help them. These are not unlimited resources, however. We have only so much emotional capacity. You know what I mean if you’ve ever had that morning customer situation that completely zaps your energy for the rest of the day. We have only so much intellectual capacity. Has anyone out there been able to keep up with changes in all the dimensions of accounting, much less the other things we have to know to run a business? And we have only so much creativity capacity. The juice it takes to rollout new products, or help customers imagine solutions to their situations, can only run so long before it needs to be replenished.

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Category:
Laboratory, Other Thoughts, Pricing
Comments:
1

Greg Kyte 2I don’t do CrossFit. I work out at home. In my garage. Alone. Partly because I’m an antisocial bastard. Partly because I’m cheap. Partly because it’s convenient. But mostly so I can watch TV with the sound on.

Last Tuesday while I was doing dumbbell lunges¹, I caught this segment of The Daily Show.

 

In it Trevor Noah talks about the Uberization of different service industries, also known as “the gig economy.” According to The Daily Show, the following actually exist: the Uber of healthcare, the Uber of tailors, the Uber of massages, and the Uber of live chicken rentals.

So I had to ask myself, is it possible to Uberfy the accounting profession? And what objectives would have to be met to achieve full Uberfication? Read more

Category:
CPA firm
Comments:
4
REFM - Adrian Photo Square - CATOB“The pathway to your greatest potential is through your greatest fear.” -Craig Groeschel

This is where it gets real. The blog posts are one thing. The conferences. An inspiring TED talk or coffee exchange with a peer. But eventually it all comes down to you, and the action. And the fear that’s present in that moment.

I’m convinced that facing fear is perhaps the biggest skill we can develop as business owners. Heck, as human persons. To me, here’s an example of human business, and how developing this skill in business, can actually feed back into our life outside of business. And vice versa. I know it has for me.

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Category:
Other Thoughts, Personal Growth
Comments:
4