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Deeper Weekend 2014

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  • Adrian Simmons
    Adrian Simmons
  • Bryan Coleman
    Bryan Coleman
  • Greg Kyte
    Greg Kyte
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  • Ian Crook
    Ian Crook
  • Jason Blumer
    Jason Blumer
  • Jennifer Blumer
    Jennifer Blumer
  • Scott Kregel
    Scott Kregel
REFM -  Adrian Photo Square - CATOBThose of you tracking the Thriveal blog for a while may have noticed one of the themes I’ve been exploring over time through my posts is: where is the practice of accounting headed? Entries on that topic include:  A Profession In Search of an IdentityThe Firm(s) of the Future(s)Accounting Is Not the Language of Business, and the most recent: Accounting For What. In that post, I came right up to, but didn’t take, the last leap in the hopscotch of the thought process, which is what I’d like to share now: “The customer is the product.”

 

I first heard that phrase uttered by good friend and Verasage founder, Ron Baker, at a conference last fall and it caused me to do a full stop in my tracks. I realized I can be focused on what we’re selling, and changing our offerings, and marketing our products and services, and on and on. But the truth of the matter is, it’s the customer that’s the product. And what I do is best measured by how it changes their lives.
Category:
Business, Customer Experience
Comments:
5

Scott KregelWho doesn’t like a good David versus Goliath story? You know, the nerdy kid at school who has the last laugh at the expense of the most popular kid. Or the low seeded team defeating a high seed in a key game. Or what about the current Xero versus QuickBooks drama that is being played out in the accounting software space? These are all David versus Goliath stories; metaphors for nearly impossible victories and overcoming obstacles in our lives.

Read more

Category:
Book Review
Comments:
5
Jason BlumerWho owns the strategy of your firm? You do. No one else is responsible for the strategy you set as the owner of your firm. Before we dive in further, let me tell you how I define business strategy:

 

Business strategy is the intentional execution plan of your firm’s why.
There are 3 key parts to my definition:
1. Intentional – there are no accidents in strategy. Accidents do happen, but you don’t plan for them. Strategy is your attempt to plan. Strategy is just another word for being intentional in our businesses. Read more
Category:
Strategy
Comments:
3

Greg Kyte 2I had Liberty Tax Service do my 2013 taxes. Don’t judge me.

I went because of Walt Disney. I heard he was inspired to create Disneyland because he was grossed out when he took his kids to some nasty carnivals. So I thought about what would gross me out in the accounting profession, and decided to go to Liberty Tax Service – the carneys of the accounting profession – for inspiration.

I arrived at Liberty Tax at 11:00 a.m. on Presidents’ Day. The open-concept office was austere: two small fake trees, white walls, fluorescent lights. The “waiting room” area had some toys for kids to both play with and contract hepatitis from. I assumed it was a temporary office. I was later told that it’s year-round. Read more

Category:
Customer Experience, Pricing, Taxes
Comments:
7

REFM -  Adrian Photo Square - CATOBIt’s coming. But somehow it helps to know it’s coming.

 

There’s always the initial excitement, and the expansive vision of new possibilities. Then reality sets in.

 

The key is to recognize it’s part of the process: One does not reach the “plateau of productivity” without walking through the “trough of disillusionment.” The trough is where the idea is purified, distilled, crystallized — stripped of its misconceptions, to see what truly lays inside. Read more

Category:
Business
Comments:
8

Jason BlumerThe Necessity of Boundaries

“You get what you tolerate.” Dr. Henry Cloud, author of Boundaries. When we are bombarded by the burdens of others, it is hard to say ‘no’ to their needs. And when we tolerate the impositions of others in areas that are not our responsibilities, we become a slave to meeting the needs of other people. When we say ‘yes’ to someone or something that is not our responsibility, then we are saying ‘no’ to someone or something else. Many are controlled by the needs of others and fail to ever get a glimpse of what they have said ‘no’ to.

 

In a Fast Company article, Why Productive People Have Empty Schedules, Warren Buffett said “You’ve gotta keep control of your time, and you can’t unless you say no. You can’t let people set your agenda in life.” Warren Buffett understood boundaries – the lines where your responsibility begins and where my responsibility ends. Read more

Category:
Personal Growth, Uncategorized
Comments:
9