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REFM -  Adrian Photo Square - CATOBThose of you tracking the Thriveal blog for a while may have noticed one of the themes I’ve been exploring over time through my posts is: where is the practice of accounting headed? Entries on that topic include:  A Profession In Search of an IdentityThe Firm(s) of the Future(s)Accounting Is Not the Language of Business, and the most recent: Accounting For What. In that post, I came right up to, but didn’t take, the last leap in the hopscotch of the thought process, which is what I’d like to share now: “The customer is the product.”

 

I first heard that phrase uttered by good friend and Verasage founder, Ron Baker, at a conference last fall and it caused me to do a full stop in my tracks. I realized I can be focused on what we’re selling, and changing our offerings, and marketing our products and services, and on and on. But the truth of the matter is, it’s the customer that’s the product. And what I do is best measured by how it changes their lives.
Category:
Business, Customer Experience
Comments:
5

REFM -  Adrian Photo Square - CATOBIt’s coming. But somehow it helps to know it’s coming.

 

There’s always the initial excitement, and the expansive vision of new possibilities. Then reality sets in.

 

The key is to recognize it’s part of the process: One does not reach the “plateau of productivity” without walking through the “trough of disillusionment.” The trough is where the idea is purified, distilled, crystallized — stripped of its misconceptions, to see what truly lays inside. Read more

Category:
Business
Comments:
8
REFM -  Adrian Photo Square - CATOBThe Thriveal Laboratory’s first Bunsen Burner Chat was held January 29, and was a great opportunity for folks around the globe to connect about experimentation in the accounting industry. ­­ We had participants from Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and the good ol’ US of A represented, as well as different sizes and different types of firms. A few of the highlights from our gathering:

 

  • We talked about how firms are currently experimenting. Challen Edwards of Holland Solutions LLC shared about how she’s invited selected customers to join in the exploration process by volunteering to try new things with her. And Zach Krogdahl shared how his firm beta ­tested some payroll changes among a select group of customers first, intentionally providing them an added level of attention and support, with a plan to rollout the changes to their customer base as a whole in phase two. Chad Davis of LiveCA shared how he drew inspiration from a MailChimp blog post for how numbers and information could be presented in new and impactful ways.

Read more

Category:
Laboratory
Comments:
0

REFM -  Adrian Photo Square - CATOBWhen the inevitable question comes up in social interactions: “What do you do?” one of my favored replies is, “I help people account for things…usually it’s their money, but not always.”

 

What is accounting really? Read more

Category:
Customer Experience
Comments:
5

On December 10, 2013, Thriveal announced the creation of a laboratory for the accounting profession. But what does that actually mean?

In this video, I give a quick five-minute sketch of what the Lab is designed to be:

And next Wednesday, January 29, we’ll be hosting our first “Bunsen Burner Chat” — an opportunity for anyone who’s interested to chat about the Lab, its goings on, to ask questions, talk with other interested industry members, and get a sneak peek at what we have planned for 2014. The chat is scheduled for 4 pm EST, and you can sign up here.

Let the experimentation begin!

Category:
Laboratory
Comments:
0

REFM -  Adrian Photo Square - CATOBThe four dimensions of time are: past, present, future, and nothing. Everything comes from nothing.

The past is already set: it’s not going to change (though how we understand it certainly can change). The present is really the result of the past: what was set in motion then becomes today’s now. And the future will be the result of what we do today. At first glance, it seems like a closed system: at one level at least, everything’s predetermined. The action-reaction chain has already begun, and it’s simply playing out. Read more

Category:
Innovation, Other Thoughts, Personal Growth
Comments:
8